Remembrances of the Albion Seventh Day Baptist Church in Honor of its 175th Anniversary

Remembrances of the Albion Seventh Day Baptist Church in Honor of its 175th Anniversary

Sep 26, 2017

by Carole Loveless Jaworski My remembrances of the Albion Seventh Day Baptist Church go back to World War II. I was four years old in 1943 when I came to live with my grandma and grandpa, Ruby and Robert Gaines, in Albion, WI. By that time, my father, Robert Loveless, was serving in the U.S. Army, stationed at Fort Bliss Army Base in El Paso, TX. My mother, Leora (Gaines) Loveless, had taken a war-time job at Borg Industries in Delevan, WI, to make home front ends meet. As part of the job, she and other war-time workers lived in a dormitory on site. At the time I came to live with my grandparents, my grandmother was the Albion SDB Church pianist — later to be the church organist when an organ was purchased for the church after the war. Ken Van Horn, the first pastor I remember, became the Albion SDB Church pastor in 1944, living in the parsonage with his wife, Doris, and son, Rodney Wayne, daughter, Arlouene, and son, Floyd, through the war until 1952. Sometime in 1944, my mother returned to Albion and she and I, and later my brother Allan, lived above Marsden’s General Store across the street from the parsonage. That same winter, Ken Van Horn began a yearly tradition of flooding the parsonage’s front lawn for an ice skating rink. I got my first pair of ice skates that year — strap-on-your-shoes, very flat, double-runner ice skates — about the same thickness as a pair of metal pie plates (with approximately the same performance) strapped to your feet. I remember each evening strapping on the skates, clunking down the second-story steps of our apartment, crossing the street to the parsonage, stepping over the low snow banks to the ice, and learning how to skate. Through the years it was awesome fun for all of us and so much better than ice skating on Saunders Creek — which was narrow and subject to patches of thin ice, often resulting in spills and wet feet. While I lived in Albion, from 1943 until I was a senior in high school in 1957 when we moved to Edgerton, the Albion...

Marlboro SDB History

Marlboro SDB History

Mar 23, 2017

by Diane Cruzan In the spring of 1811 Our history had its start. Once members of the Shiloh Church, our forefathers chose to part. Their reason was the distance; Too far for horse and man. And so with Shiloh’s blessing, They made good on their plan. They met in homes until the day their labors were complete. The little church built “in the barrens” was just 20 x 30 feet. Twenty-six names were written down to form that church, most humble; names like Crosby, Bennett, Wood, Davis, Ayars and Campbell. 12 ½ cents was charged each year per man to pay the bills. Women paid just half that much, their duty to fulfill. Sister Patience Ayars was hired to sweep the church and clean. She earned a whopping $2.00 per year but her work was overseen by the ladies of the church, who found that she skipped a week, one time. They docked her a dollar from her wage for her neglectful crime. At the next business meeting she countered with an offer much better than theirs. She would clean the church for a year for free, and that’s all we know of Sister Ayars. In 1837 the church was moved to this place, “two miles nearer Shiloh.” Overflowing with 135 members, that building they were soon to outgrow. The church’s first name, what it was for a time (and I’m sorry, there’s just no way to make it rhyme) was “The Second Seventh Day Baptist Church in the Western Division of the State of New Jersey.” But after the church was moved and the marl was discovered nearby, it seemed the name of Marlboro would more aptly apply. The present church building was dedicated in the spring of 1861. They had met in the basement for 7 years and were glad when it was done. Many deeds and names are noted in the church minutes since the start. It’s easy to see the members had a warm spot in their heart for this church, the Marlboro SDB. Yes, those souls who were so fervent, when reaching their final home surely heard, “Thou good and faithful servant.” We’ve had 33 pastors in 200 years,...

It’s All About The People: 100 Years of the SDB Historical Society Celebrated at General Conference

It’s All About The People: 100 Years of the SDB Historical Society Celebrated at General Conference

Aug 29, 2016

By Nicholas J. Kersten During the afternoon activities at General Conference, the SDB Council on History was allotted 45 minutes to honor and celebrate a century of ministry of the Seventh Day Baptist Historical Society. The Society was merged with the General Conference in April of this year, but not before the Society entered its one hundredth year of preserving and promoting Seventh Day Baptist history.     The current members of the Council on History celebrated the many people who undertook and represented the Society over its one hundred years of ministry — including the many directors and officers of the Society, its employees (Historians, Librarians and other staff), the many donors who supported the work over the years, and the recipients of the Gold Headed Cane (awarded by the Society to honor those who made especially notable contributions to the work of the Society and the preservation of SDB history). The program made it clear that history, while directed and shaped by God, is ultimately made through people: for one hundred years, the Society was all about the people.     As part of the celebration of the Society’s work, a special award was given to Wayne C. Maxson, who has long served the Society in a variety of roles including as a trustee, an advisor, and a consultant — in addition to his many other contributions to the work. Wayne was on hand to receive his award and to celebrate the day with us! During the awards time, the Council on History also had the privilege of awarding the Gold Headed Cane to Rev. J. Paul Green for his eighteen years of service to the SDB Historical Society as a director and treasurer. Paul was not present to receive his award, and so arrangements are being made to present it to him formally after Conference. In addition to the celebratory program and awards, the Council on History was able to introduce a new video which promotes the importance of SDB historic preservation in local churches. It also gives the history of the Historical Society’s ministry and encourages giving to the Society’s Centennial Fund to provide for future historic preservation efforts. The video...