Pastor Profile: Darwin Steele

Pastor Profile: Darwin Steele

Mar 23, 2017

Darwin Steele began serving as the Lead Pastor of SpringsLife Church in Colorado Springs, CO, in January 2016. He previously served as Associate Pastor of the Boulder SDB Church where he was ordained to the gospel ministry. He graduated from Liberty University twice with a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. He has been married to his wife, Cheryl, for 23 years. They have a dog, Triton. I had the opportunity to ask Pastor Darwin a few questions and capture his responses so that you can know him a little better. Q: What is something you are excited about at church and with SDBs? A: SDBs bring a history of family to the body of Christ. That history is now meeting the exciting world of local missions/evangelism. SpringsLife Church is such an example where the local church mirrors the eclectic mix of history meeting change that exemplifies the 21st Century. Q: What is the most important thing about ministering in the 21st Century? A: Accepting change; we can no longer do business as usual. Q: What is your favorite book (not the Bible)? A: The Essential Works of Andrew Murray published by Barbour Press. Q: Who would you love to spend dinner with (dead or alive, not Jesus, not your wife)? A: My Great Grandfather, Darwin Andrews. Q: What do you love most about being a pastor? A: I love the people. I cherish their stories and their journeys. Q: Who are some mentors/role models in your life? A: Dwayne Bartley, Southern Baptist Pastor – Calgary, Canada; Dave Early, Pastor of Grace City Church, Las Vegas, NV; Pastor Steve Osborn; Pastor Rod Henry. Every so often we will feature some information on one of our currently serving pastors to help you get to know them a little...

Splinters

Splinters

Mar 23, 2017

by Donna VanHorn A few years ago I was struggling with a major crisis in my life. I found myself hanging onto whatever I could find to keep me focused on Jesus and the peace that only He could provide during that stormy time. On one particular day during that time, I stopped by my daughter’s house. Once inside, I felt a sharp pain in my hand. I looked down and was appalled to find I’d picked up a sliver. I realized it was probably the result of grasping the rustic wooden rail on her back steps. The image that popped into my mind at that moment was of Jesus’ cross. I was holding so tightly to His cross during those days that I could literally feel the splinters of the crude wood. My friends, you need to cling to the cross of Jesus so fiercely that you get splinters! “For the message of the cross…is the power of God.” — 1 Corinthians 1:18  ...

Do You Believe This?

Do You Believe This?

Mar 23, 2017

By Rev. Herbert E. Saunders In C. S. Lewis’ fantasy, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, the great lion, Aslan (the representation of God and his Son who has been sacrificed by the white witch) rises to life again. The first place Aslan goes after his resurrection is to the citadel of the white witch. He then breathes on the stone statues of animals and beings the white witch has cursed and they become living beings again. The idea of resurrection is scary! If God’s Son is really alive then I will have to deal with Him. I have no choice. A family was living in a caretaker’s house in a cemetery. They were able to live there provided they did some upkeep for the cemetery. They finally found a house to purchase in the town in which they were living. They told a co-worker to tell a pastor friend that they would be moving and added, “it’s not every day someone moves out of a cemetery.” That’s true…but we know Someone who did. And because He did, we shall. This is the message of the raising of Lazarus from the dead. George Matheson writes: “It is not resurrection that has made Christ; it is Christ that has made resurrection.” The biblical narrative from John eleven starts with Jesus and His disciples located in what was known as Perea. They had been to Jerusalem for the Feast of Dedication, but returned to Perea to avoid some of Jesus’ conflict with the Jews. The narrative begins: Now a certain man was ill, Lazarus of Bethany, the village of Mary and her sister Martha. Mary and Martha, along with their brother Lazarus, were three of Jesus’ closest friends besides the disciples. Bethany was on the opposite side of the Mount of Olives from the Holy City, just a couple of miles away. So the sisters sent a message to Jesus, “Lord, he whom you love is ill.” When Jesus heard it, He said, “This illness does not lead to death; rather it is for God’s glory, so that the Son of God may be glorified through it.” Jesus didn’t immediately rush to Bethany and Lazarus’...

The Lord’s Prayer: Thy Kingdom Come…

The Lord’s Prayer: Thy Kingdom Come…

Mar 23, 2017

by Phil Lawton When I think about kingdoms I get images of knights and kings and wizards. For some, you might think about our neighbor across the pond. Our earthly understanding of kingdom is geopolitical. It must be in a physical location and it must have some form of political power. The United Kingdom can be pinpointed to a specific geographical location. The kingdom of Arthur, though legend, can be characterized by a certain form of politics. Yet if I asked you to point to the Kingdom of God you could not find it on a map. If I said what are the politics of the Kingdom of Heaven, you might be able to tell me about ideals — but not any treaties that the Kingdom of God has with North Korea. The Kingdom of God does not have a seat at the UN. It does not have a navy nor an air force. No, the Kingdom of Heaven is something very different than all other kingdoms. Like all the other phrases in this series, we spend very little time actually trying to understand what it means. We simply say it and assume that it means the same thing to me as it does to you. The problem with this is that we have not truly looked at what God, through the Bible, has to say about it. We are not the first group that thought we knew what God wanted in a kingdom. Give Us a King In the early years of the nation of Israel there is no king. For 40 years they wander the desert with God as their guide. When they enter the promised land it is under the leadership of Joshua, but he is not their king. When they set up their nation there was no king. Each of the twelve tribes was given land. The book of Judges shows us that the People of God continually did what was right in their own eyes. The people would fall away and God would raise up a judge to free the people from oppression. Judge after judge take over leading the people. By the time of Samuel this position is...

The Church of Chicken Little

The Church of Chicken Little

Mar 23, 2017

by Chad Bird Here’s what will happen. Maybe you’ve already been through it. Or maybe you’re living through it right now. I don’t know what will trigger it — I’m no prophet — but I do know, sooner or later, something will. The company you’ve poured your heart and soul into goes belly up. Your spouse slips off her wedding ring, puts it on the counter, and slams the door forever behind her. The tests show that the tumor is, in fact, malignant. The details will vary. But in that moment, and in the days and weeks — maybe even years — that follow, you’re convinced that the sky is falling. Your life is basically over. Draw the curtains, turn out the lights, the party’s over. I’ve been there. As have many of you. It hurts. It’s scares the hell out of you. And it’s highly deceiving. As bad as it gets, as much pain as it inflicts, it is not the end of the world. In fact, it’s not even close. It just feels that way. But if you’re not careful — as I was not careful — you’ll become so overwhelmed with all the bad stuff going on, you’ll spend so much time staring up at the sky that you’re convinced is about to fall, that you’ll forget you’ve still got work to do, people to take care of, vocations to fulfill. Your world has changed, to be sure, but it is not over. The same applies to the church, perhaps even more so. On a recurring basis, Christians spot news headlines that signal yet one more moral collapse in society, the growing paganization of the cultures in which we live, the spread of antipathy toward the faith. And then — Lord, have mercy — it hits social media. Facebook becomes an online pity-party or preaching-party, lamenting the end of society as we know it. Twitter explodes with 140-or-less character doomsday-sounding predictions. And in pulpits across the land, pastors have plenty of fodder for their Sunday morning sermons. I get the concern. I really do. But if we’re not careful, we’ll become engrossed with all the bad news. We’ll end up sounding...