Of Rings and Reminders

Of Rings and Reminders

Apr 24, 2013

Of Rings and Reminders by Kevin Butler     Reminders.        “Remember the Sabbath Day by keeping it holy.” (Exod. 20:8)        “What do these stones mean?” (Joshua 4:6)        “These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up.” (Deut. 6:6-7)   On our way to Hawaii this past February I noticed a small advertisement in the airplane magazine. It featured some beautiful rings that were made and sold in Hawaii. The ad said that the designer uses koa wood (native to the 50th state) and places it in a titanium setting. The wood against the silver tone looked striking. Some of the rings also had inlays of colorful Australian opal along with the wood. Having once visited Australia, this piqued my curiosity, but I eventually set aside the magazine to do some other reading (or napping). A few days later, while on a short flight between islands, I saw the same ad. This time I copied down the address. There was my reminder. Following a day of fun touristy stuff, we arrived at the jewelry store in the late afternoon. I asked the congenial young man behind the counter about those koa wood rings. Chad knew just what and where they were. It turns out that he was the store owner. When I saw the rings with the fancier stones, I felt a bit put off by the busyness of the design—and the price was certainly a deterrent. But the ones with the simple wooden band still intrigued me. I guess I was in the market for a special souvenir. After several fittings, we finally settled on my finger size (I haven’t worn a ring on my right hand in years) and discovered that there was one of those “plain” rings in stock. I tried it on. I liked how it looked. Then Chad added some information that sealed the deal for me. “These rings are made one at a time here in Hawaii. Other stores offer similar ones, but...

Family Flux: May 2013

Family Flux: May 2013

Apr 24, 2013

Marriages Page – Stillman.  Jason Paul Page and Christine Catharine Stillman were united in marriage on December 29, 2012 in Missouri City, TX. Killingbeck – Wethington.  Caleb Justus Killingbeck and Jenna Lynn Wethington were united in marriage on February 24, 2013 at the White Cloud, MI, SDB Church. Rev. Bernie Wethington, father of the bride, officiated. Diederich – Stillman.  James Diederich and Danielle Miriam Stillman were united in marriage on April 6, 2013 in New Orleans, LA. Births Ryschon.—A son, Holden Levi, was born to Jordan and Kristan Ryschon of North Loup, NE on February 14, 2013. Baker.—A daughter, Madison Rae, was born to Ben and Nicole (Musselman) Baker of New Enterprise, PA on March 18, 2013. Clark.—A daughter, Aria Isolda, was born to Brett and Liana (Stillman) Clark of Boston, MA on March 26, 2013. Harris.—A son, John Franklin, was born to Josh and Margot (Walker) Harris of Janesville, WI on April 17, 2013.   New Members Metro Atlanta, GA John Pethtel, pastor Joined after testimony Marie Bullmer Linda Waters   Texarkana, AR Mynor Soper, pastor Joined after testimony Jerry Littles   Obituaries Day.— Fern Day, 91, entered into her Lord’s arms December 6, 2012 in Wheat Ridge, Colo. She was born in Baca County, Colo. Fern was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Lee, for whom she was also caretaker for 33 years. She lovingly sheltered and cared for her various family members throughout her life. She was a member of the Denver (now Next Step) Seventh Day Baptist Church. She is survived by her daughter Joyce Conrod of Wheat Ridge and her son Larry Day, of Missouri; sisters, Mary Springer and Alice May Hirt; seven grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.   Shaw.— Edwin “Ed” E. Shaw, 83, of Milton, Wis., left this world to be with our Lord and Savior, at the Edgerton (Wis.) Care Center on March 7, 2013. Ed was born on March 10, 1929 in Janesville, Wis., the son of Elston and Emma (Maxson) Shaw. He graduated from Milton Union High School in 1947 and from Milton College in 1956. Ed served in the Army during the Korean Conflict from 1951-1953, and married Martha A. McCumber on October 13,...

SDB Pastor’s Retirement Fund

SDB Pastor’s Retirement Fund

Apr 24, 2013

SDB Pastor’s Retirement Fund SUPPORTING THOSE WHO GAVE SO MUCH         The Pastor’s Retirement Fund provides monthly support to retired SDB pastors or their widows. The following provides some background on Pastor John and Joyce Conrod.   John Conrod was born in Chicago, Ill., in 1940. He accepted Christ at a young age at church camp and decided he wanted to be a missionary—inspired by Elisabeth Elliot’s book Through Gates of Splendor recounting her husband’s diary entry, “He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.” John worked at the Chicago Rescue Mission while in his teens. While at Northern Baptist Seminary he served the Chicago SDB church (part-time) 1957-59. He graduated with a BA in business in 1961 from Seattle Pacific University, where he met Joyce. They married in 1961. They had two children, Michael and Philip. John and Joyce wanted to be more involved in church ministry so they accepted a call to serve at the Kansas City SDB Church 1963-64 (part-time). John obtained his M.Div from Eastern Baptist Seminary in 1969. He completed his SDB Summer Institutes during that time. He served as student pastor at the Washington, D.C., SDB Church (1964-65), and the Salemville, Pa., SDB church (1965-66), and then full-time at the Marlboro, N.J., SDB Church (1966-69) where he was ordained. They accepted a missionary call for a minister and accountant to serve in Malawi, Africa from 1969-72. John studied linguistics at the University of PA and then both attended the Washington School of Missions before leaving for the mission field. While in Malawi, John wrote a series of Sabbath Recorder articles about their work, and translated a tract “It is Your Decision” that he wrote in 1964. Joyce home-schooled their children, wrote Malawian Youth lessons for one quarter, and several articles about her experiences. John was appointed Field Pastor of the Pacific Coast Association, serving 1972-74. He then accepted the Denver SDB Church call to serve full-time 1974-76. Joyce enjoyed teaching at camp, Vacation Bible School, Sabbath school and giving children sermons. After serving in Denver, John worked full-time and part-time in various accounting positions for secular and...

Epitaph Epilogue

Epitaph Epilogue by Leanne Lippincott-Wuerthele   In last month’s column, I shared some actual tombstone epitaphs. Here are a few more. This epitaph appears on an 1880s-era grave in Nantucket, Mass.: “Under the sod and under the trees, lies the body of Jonathan Pease. He is not here, there’s only the pod. Pease shelled out and went to God.” Auctioneer Jedediah Goodwin was born in 1828 and died in 1876. His tombstone reads, “Going! Going!! Gone!!!” American television host Merv Griffin died in 2007 at age 82. His epitaph reads, “I will not be right back after this message.” Mel Blanc, the voice of such Looney Tunes characters as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Porky Pig, is buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery. His tombstone reads, “Mel Blanc, Man of 1,000 voices—Beloved husband and father, 1908-1989.” Also engraved are the words, “That’s All Folks.” A tombstone of a hanged sheep rustler buried in Larne, Ireland, reads, “Here lies the body of Thomas Kemp, who lived by wool and died by hemp.” A gravestone in Woodville, England, reads, “The dust of Melantha Gribbling, swept up at last by the Great Housekeeper.” Seen on a dentist’s grave in Edinburgh, Scotland: “Stranger tread this ground with gravity. Dentist Brown is filling his last cavity.” A coalminer’s grave has this succinct inscription: “Gone Underground for Good.” Here’s another brief but informative epitaph: “Here lies the body of good old Fred… a great big rock fell on his head.” This appears on a gravedigger’s tombstone: “Hooray my brave boys, let’s rejoice at his fall. For if he had lived, he would have buried us all.” Revivalist Leonard Ravenhill (1907-1994) was born in Yorkshire, England, but is buried in Garden Valley, Texas. The phrase, “Carried by Angels,” appears at the top of his grave marker. Underneath Rev. Ravenhill’s name are these thought-provoking words: “Are the things you are living for worth Christ dying for?” Captain Thomas Coffin, a fisherman, died in 1842 at age 50. His epitaph in New Shoreham, R.I., reads, “He’s done a-catching cod and gone to meet his God.” American singer Rick James, who died in 2004 at age 56, had many ups and downs during his life,...

When can you get Palliative Care?

When can you get Palliative Care? by Barb Green, Parish Nurse Milton, Wis.   Palliative care is comfort care given to a patient who has a serious or life-threatening disease, and is provided from the time of diagnosis and throughout the course of illness. A palliative care specialist will work with a team of health care professionals such as doctors, nurses, dieticians, pharmacists and social workers. This should not be confused with hospice. Palliative care is offered earlier in the disease process and is given along with treatment for the disease. The goal is to maintain the best possible quality of life. (Hospice care is a form of palliative care that is given when therapies are no longer controlling the disease and the diagnosis is terminal.) Palliative care focuses on relieving the symptoms, pain and stress of serious illness and is widely available. About two-thirds of hospitals with 50 or more beds offer these services. Patients who get this type of care may not only enjoy improved quality of life but may even live longer than those who do not get these services. Medicare or private health insurance usually covers the cost. Many physicians may be unfamiliar with palliative care or fail to recommend it because they equate it with hospice or end-of-life care. This is not true. You can receive palliative care along with treatment. You don’t have to be dying to get it; anyone with a serious illness is eligible. This team-based approach works with your family and doctors to coordinate treatment, provide services that ease suffering, and offer counseling. These services address: •Physical concerns: pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, shortness of breath, insomnia •Emotional and coping concerns: depression, anxiety and fear •Practical concerns: financial, insurance questions, completion of advance directives •Spiritual concerns: struggles with doubt and values, and finding peace and acceptance If your doctor doesn’t suggest palliative care, ask about it. He or she should be able to offer a referral. Usually these services are administered through a hospital, hospice program or independent agency. To get the most from palliative care, talk to the program coordinator about what your loved one needs most. Is it relief from pain, nausea or...